Bock

On the Gospel Sept 15, 09

This entry is an mp3. A few months ago I did an interview with Preaching Today, a wing of Christianity Today, on the gospel. I am working on a book on the gospel. So this is a piece of the point I will be making in the book.

Listen, enjoy, and if you wish, respond.

Here is the link:

This entry is an mp3. A few months ago I did an interview with Preaching Today, a wing of Christianity Today, on the gospel. I am working on a book on the gospel. So this is a piece of the point I will be making in the book.

Listen, enjoy, and if you wish, respond.

Here is the link:

http://blog.preachingtoday.com/2009/02/darrell_bock_on_small_or_large.html

8 Comments

  • Avatar

    Daniel Vassen

    Two times good news! Thanks
    Two times good news! Thanks for this helpful interview! I’m looking forward to read this book.

  • Avatar

    Brett Williamss

    Dr. Bock:
    I was excited to

    Dr. Bock:

    I was excited to hear you speak on the relationship of sin to the gospel. Many hold that Christ paid for all the sins of the world, even for unbelievers. The result of this is that people will still end up in hell because of their rejecting Christ, even thought Christ paid for their sins.

    My question for you is: could you address the relationship of personal sins (not the sin of unbelief) to man’s 1) condemnation and 2) salvation?

    • Avatar

      bock

      Excited dlb

      Brett:

      Not exactly sure what you are asking for here.  My own take is that Jesus’ work on the cross deals with any person’s sin potentially (1 John 2:2), but that no benefit is applied until that person responds in faith with the desire that work be applied to them and with a recognition of their need for it. The result of such faith is that the Spirit gives new life and no condemnation for sin results (Rom 8:1).

      dlb 

    • Avatar

      bock

      Dan Brown dlb

      Steve:

      No, I am deep into other things and trying hard not to respond to this novel. I know there are problems with his take on what the Bible teaches in this newest book, but this is no surprise given his earlier work. I do not think at this point it is worth drawing excessive attention to his thinking and writing. I reserve the right to change my mind, but so far I am inclined to give him much attention.  

      dlb 

  • Avatar

    Magnus Nordlund

    Was the historical Jesus interested in reaching the gentiles
    Time after time I hear scholars postulate that the real Jesus was not interested in reaching the gentiles.. The evidence for his reluctance concerning this, is explicit in foremost Matthew 10:5ff; 15:24 (but also in Mark concerning the Syrophoenician woman)..
    The other evidence for this is the early missions in Acts which began among the Jews; and the fact when it started to move towards the gentiles Peter were reluctant to go along this line … This would not have been a problem for Peter if Jesus had been clear on this while he lived…

    If were are going to use the razor of Occam regarding this problem or rather the criterion of embarrasment we have to claim:

    a. these words and attitudes of Jesus are true and autentic
    b. Peters attitude and reluctance is grounded on the fact that his Master never instructed him or gave the imperative order to preach to the lost Gentiles;
    c. Matthew 28:19ff is either another source or added by the early christians which found Jesus over all ethnic partiality disturbing and controversial (and therefore changed it; maybe influenced by the pauline party).
    d. we have to make a distinction between the real historical Jesus and the belief and experience of Christ after his death by the early Christians.
    (I. E. the real Jesus was not interested in reaching the gentiles; however the risen Christ of faith was…)

    Whats your stand on this?

    Sincerely Magnus Nordlund

    • Avatar

      bock

      Gentiles dlb

      Magnus:

      I think Jesus did not highlight this, although he did respond to Gentiles who approached him (The centurion and his remarks about Samaritans are examples). I think the disciples may well have read his commission initially as going out into the nations primarily to reclaim Jews in other nations.  Or it may be they were not clear on how directly Gentiles could come in, so that limited the options.

       

      Darrell 

  • Avatar

    TNThorne

    The short gospel
    Thanks for your clarification of the essential gospel message. I agree that we do not need to get caught up in the mechanics of salvation when leading someone to Jesus. Far too often I believe we over-complicate the message and it only drives the future Christ-follower away. I try to weave a simple gospel message into every sermon I preach, usually in the form of a single sentence such as, “Trust in Jesus alone for both this life and the one to come.” Such a statement may not explain crucifixion, resurrection, substitution, atonement, forgiveness of sins, the baptism of the Holy Spirit or numerous other concepts that surround the salvation experience, but it is enough. The rest of it becomes an adventure of discovery for the new believer.