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WWJD to keep Christ in Christmas?

Around the world, retailers are smiling, travelers are packing, hosts are cleaning. Christmas songs are piped over mall speakers and elves populate commercial after commercial. In the midst of the Ho Ho Ho’s, the hustle and bustle, and all those cash registers ringing like silver bells, Christians cry out: “Keep Christ in Christmas!” We don bumper stickers with the slogan; we complain about the commercialism; we forgo the Santa decorations and pull out the Nativity scenes. But have Christians forgotten one of the most important ways to keep Christ in Christmas?


Around the world, retailers are smiling, travelers are packing, hosts are cleaning. Christmas songs are piped over mall speakers and elves populate commercial after commercial. In the midst of the Ho Ho Ho’s, the hustle and bustle, and all those cash registers ringing like silver bells, Christians cry out: “Keep Christ in Christmas!” We don bumper stickers with the slogan; we complain about the commercialism; we forgo the Santa decorations and pull out the Nativity scenes. But have Christians forgotten one of the most important ways to keep Christ in Christmas?

Christmas is a time of joy, peace and love. It’s also when people dread having to spend hours with unpleasant relatives. At this most glorious season, cars (some with fish decals) cut off others for parking places. To celebrate Christ’s birth, cooks morph into monstrous perfectionists for that idyllic dinner no one appreciates. Unbelieving guests, held captive by tradition and hunger, are pummeled by sermon-long prayers that hosts has saved up all year long. And whatever Peace on Earth remains stops after the meal, when Certain People retire to the living room to socialize rather than help clean up.

But because we read the Christmas story aloud, or guilt atheist cousin Ed into going to the Christmas Eve service, or play Hymns rather than secular Santa songs, we think we’ve done our job protecting Baby Jesus. I’m thinking we’ve missed the mark. Assuming you’re keeping Christ in Christmas through scripture, fellowship, prayer and gratitude, what else is there? How about acting like Jesus would?

Scripture shows Jesus around a lot of sinners and unbelievers. In these accounts, they don’t seem too worried about spilling cranberry sauce on Jesus’ good table cloth. They don’t enter the party defensively in case Jesus brought up politics. They don’t seem to dread getting cornered by Jesus. Seems like when Jesus hung out with Certain People, they felt loved and seen and recognized. They weren’t looking at the time–they wanted to be with him. It wasn’t about perfect decorations, or taking this one opportunity to tell them they’re wrong, or judging who’s polite and who’s a boar. It was Love.

This Christmas, I pray that we wouldn’t notice the spills and imperfections, that we wouldn’t zealously batter unbelievers with “Grace”, that we wouldn’t stress out our families with guilt or discord or judgment. I pray that this year, our guests (even the unbelieving ones) would feel welcome and loved and delighted in. I pray that they would want to be around us more because we radiate true joy, peace and love, and we’d start deeper relationship where conversations of faith would come naturally over time.

In this season of awe of the Immanuel, I pray that we’d keep Christ in Christmas by keeping Christ in us, and letting him shine through.

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Laura Singleton

Laura Singleton’s passion is the transformation that happens when women get access to God’s Word and God’s Word gets access to women. She was twenty-five when her life was turned upside down by an encounter with Jesus Christ. With an insatiable thirst for scripture and theology, she soon headed to Dallas Theological Seminary to learn more about Jesus, and left with a Th.M. with an emphasis in Media Arts. She, along with two friends from DTS, travel the nation filming the independent documentary Looking for God in America. She loves speaking and teaching and is the author of Insight for Living Ministry’s Meeting God in Familiar Places and hundreds of ads, which pay the bills. Her big strong hubby Paul is a former combat medic, which is handy since Laura’s almost died twice already. She loves photography, travel and her two pugs.