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    New Resource: “Was Junia Joanna?” and Other Questions Worth Exploring

    Long before second-wave feminism influenced researchers to include biographies of “women worthies,” historians writing on the Greco-Roman world included at least passing references to the Caesars’ wives. The dust jacket on the 1962 publication of Roman Women: Their History and Habits said its release marked the first time a book in any language addressed women’s influence on Roman history and the public and private lives of Roman women. Still, it covered mostly upper-class women. Thirteen years later in 1975 Sarah Pomeroy published a pioneering social history of women in Greece and Rome. Her provocatively titled book, Goddesses, Whores, Wives and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity, covered an enormous range, from…