Heartprints

Making Your Own Resurrection Eggs

Resurrection Eggs seem to be one of the biggest Christian family fads for Easter. If you haven’t heard of them before, the concept is pretty simple. Twelve plastic eggs help as visual aids in retelling the Easter story. Each egg has an item which symbolizes part of the story. But before you go thinking… I already spent a bucket load of money on Easter baskets, and now you want me to get Resurrection Eggs too? … here is a cheap and fun way to make your own.

Resurrection Eggs seem to be one of the biggest Christian family fads for Easter. If you haven’t heard of them before, the concept is pretty simple. Twelve plastic eggs help as visual aids in retelling the Easter story. Each egg has an item which symbolizes part of the story. But before you go thinking… I already spent a bucket load of money on Easter baskets, and now you want me to get Resurrection Eggs too? … here is a cheap and fun way to make your own.

 

You’ll need: (1) 12 plastic eggs, (2) an empty egg carton or a container, (3) marker, (4) scissors or paper trimmer, and (5) this free two page printable from Raising Busy Chickadees’ blogpost.

 

Step 1: Cut out the pictures from the printable pages and insert them into the plastic eggs. Write the corresponding number on each egg.

 

Step 2: Over the course of 12 days, 3 days, 1 day (or whatever you choose), have your children open the eggs one at a time in numerical order. Tell how each picture relates to the Easter story, or for older children ask them to tell you what is special about the picture. Egg #11 is a bit different—it’s empty! Ask them why that might be. If they can’t figure it out, explain that it symbolizes the empty tomb.

 

I was so excited to stumble over this crafty find!  And now, I am imagining a vast array of future possibilities from family story time, to an illustration in church, to having each child in a Sunday School class make their own to take home.

 

Have you used the Resurrection Eggs before? What did you like or dislike about them?

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Sarah is the author of Bathsheba’s Responsibility in Light of Narrative Analysis, contributor to Vindicating the Vixens, and contributing editor for The Evangelism Study Bible. She blogs regularly on three sites: evantell.org/blog, bible.org, and sarahbowler.com. Some of her previous ministry experiences have included teaching and mentoring of adults and children in a wide variety of settings. Her small claim to fame is that she has worked with children of every age range from birth through high school over the past 20 years. She and her husband Ben reside in Richardson, Texas with their three children.