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    Your Life through the Keyhole

    Have you ever seen a really old door on a house or stone wall with the thick iron hardware that creeks every time it opens? Back in the day, big heavy doors stood as formidable barriers that couldn’t be breached by force. Yet many of these doors were no match for prying eyes. The huge iron keys required to unlock the latches were so wide that you could actually put your eye up to the keyhole and look through to the other side. Nowadays we have small metal slits for slender keys, and sometimes only touch pads, so we can’t peer through keyholes to catch a glimpse of something beyond.…

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    Waiting with Hope in a Gelatin World

    I’ll be honest. National and world affairs burden my heart. Yes, the world changes constantly, but in recent years the Arab Spring, Brexit, and the election of unexpected leaders in a number of countries have rocked our world. Just last week elections in the Republic of Zimbabwe led to violence. What issues weigh on your heart? I work with refugees. While refugee admissions are at decades long low in my country, there are 68.5 million forcibly displaced people worldwide, according the UN Refugee agency. The dire circumstances of so many burdens me. What people inhabit your personal concerns? Wayward children, a sick friend? Do you have significant personal desires that…

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    Consider My Bluebonnets

    Have you ever seen a field of Texas bluebonnets? If you’re not a native Texan, you may not have heard of bluebonnets or appreciate the annual spring hubbub. I certainly didn’t. Until last weekend. After 10 years in the Lone Star State, I went on my first bluebonnet drive––along with 100 others in our caravan of cars following the Bluebonnet Trail through Bristol and Ennis. Field after field after field emerged as we twisted and turned through the sun-drenched countryside. Bluebonnets are to Texas what tulips are to Holland, azaleas are to Augusta, and cherry blossoms are to Washington, D.C. They integrate with culture. They draw annual pilgrimages. They display…

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    Why Worry? OR The Theology of Sheep

    I am always amazed at the “sheepness” of the big horn sheep that live in the mountain property of the Navigators at Glen Eyrie in Colorado. Observing these beautiful animals, they do exactly what God intended them to do. They are sheep. They live in sheep rhythm. They graze. They walk. They stay together. They climb the mountain rocks in front of the castle and “perform” for the guests. They sleep. They mate. They take care of their young. They get old. But, I don’t think they worry. Why should they worry? They are the picture of living worry free simply being who God designed them to be and trusting…

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    STORMS and the PRESENCE of CHRIST

    Spring storms in the Hill Country of Texas often come without a lot of notice. The deluge of water with high winds and the potential accompanying tornadoes can produce an amazing amount of damage quickly. These storms can dump so much water in a particular area that almost immediate flooding occurs creating life threatening situations. These storms are not unlike the suddenness of personal storms. Those that are unexpected and certainly were not anticipated; those storms that “dump” so much “water” on you that you are not sure of survival as you gasp and try to catch your breath. Such have been the unexpected personal storms my husband and I…

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    Why we ruminate and how to stop

    Replaying the same scenario over and over in your head, waking up to the same conversation again and again, imagining all the what-ifs, even though research tells us that only a tiny percentage of what we ruminate about actually happens.  I've worn  the label of frustrated ruminator. How about you or someone you love? Ruminating can disrupt your sanity as well as your sleep. Why do women ruminate so much more than men?        Brain research reveals that women's brains seldom shut down while men's brains occasionally rest, even while they are wide awake. Nice for them and helpful for us if we are multi-tasking, but infuriating when repetitive unproductive…